Students race balloon cars to student Newton’s Law

Teacher+Kimberly+Theisen%2C+junior+Taquia+Taylor%2C+junior+Quaterian+Riles%2C+junior+Christian+Ortiz%2C+and+junior+Johnnie+Reames+made+a+balloon+car+out+of+recycled+items+that+they+raced+down+the+hallway+Sept.+23rd+to+teach+students+that+they+can+design+and+build+things+on+their+own+with+limited+resources+and+to+explain+Newton%E2%80%99s+3rd+law+of+motion.%E2%80%9CThe+lesson+I+learned+during+this+project+is+that+no+matter+how+big+you+blow+up+your+balloon%2C+it+does+not+determine+how+far+your+car+moves%2C%E2%80%9D+junior+Taliyah+McAdams+said.
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Students race balloon cars to student Newton’s Law

Teacher Kimberly Theisen, junior Taquia Taylor, junior Quaterian Riles, junior Christian Ortiz, and junior Johnnie Reames made a balloon car out of recycled items that they raced down the hallway Sept. 23rd to teach students that they can design and build things on their own with limited resources and to explain Newton’s 3rd law of motion.“The lesson I learned during this project is that no matter how big you blow up your balloon, it does not determine how far your car moves,” junior Taliyah McAdams said.

Teacher Kimberly Theisen, junior Taquia Taylor, junior Quaterian Riles, junior Christian Ortiz, and junior Johnnie Reames made a balloon car out of recycled items that they raced down the hallway Sept. 23rd to teach students that they can design and build things on their own with limited resources and to explain Newton’s 3rd law of motion.“The lesson I learned during this project is that no matter how big you blow up your balloon, it does not determine how far your car moves,” junior Taliyah McAdams said.

Erica Adams

Teacher Kimberly Theisen, junior Taquia Taylor, junior Quaterian Riles, junior Christian Ortiz, and junior Johnnie Reames made a balloon car out of recycled items that they raced down the hallway Sept. 23rd to teach students that they can design and build things on their own with limited resources and to explain Newton’s 3rd law of motion.“The lesson I learned during this project is that no matter how big you blow up your balloon, it does not determine how far your car moves,” junior Taliyah McAdams said.

Erica Adams

Erica Adams

Teacher Kimberly Theisen, junior Taquia Taylor, junior Quaterian Riles, junior Christian Ortiz, and junior Johnnie Reames made a balloon car out of recycled items that they raced down the hallway Sept. 23rd to teach students that they can design and build things on their own with limited resources and to explain Newton’s 3rd law of motion.“The lesson I learned during this project is that no matter how big you blow up your balloon, it does not determine how far your car moves,” junior Taliyah McAdams said.

Kaitlyn Bowman, Writer

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Students in physics classes raced balloon cars to explore the purpose of Newton’s 3rd law of motion, regarding kinetic, and potential energy. Students raced their cars in the hallway on Sept. 23rd with a goal to reach five meters.

“The materials I used to build my balloon car was tape to hold everything together, straws to connect the wheels and balloon, an empty water bottle for the body of the car, caps for the wheels, and scissors to cut any needed holes,” junior Prisila Loredo said.

Students were asked to make the cars out of everyday objects, or recycled materials to save money and use the resources around them for a good educational purpose.

“My car went four meters and took about six to seven seconds to do so. I had to remake my car about three times and it still didn’t go five meters, I was disappointed, but at least my car made it to the four-meter mark,” junior Alyssa Wheaton said.

Five students volunteered to stand against the wall a meter apart and clocked in the times as the cars passed them. Passing the five-meter mark was a requirement held for the project and was part of their score.

“The lesson I learned during this project is that no matter how big you blow up your balloon, it does not determine how far your car moves,” junior Taliyah McAdams said.

Students learned many lessons from this hands-on project that gave them a visual representation of time, motion, and engineering designs. 

“I have been using the balloon car project for the last seven years. Giving the students a chance to do something on their own is always great. We used balloon cars to teach students that they can design and build things on their own with limited resources. This is a fun way to show students how to apply what we learned in class about speed,” teacher Cindy Gallen said.

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